Writers Guild May 2017 Meeting Recap

By Linda Donaldson

Spring brings a burst of activities to our varied calendars often overlapping and causing difficult choices. This was the case for many Guild members this month yielding but a half dozen participants on Sunday to join me and Anne at our meeting.

We each introduced ourselves, welcoming two new members, and caught up on what everyone is working on at present. Then we began with the four writing selections that were brought to share. Continue reading “Writers Guild May 2017 Meeting Recap”

April Guild Meets in 2017

By Linda Donaldson

Spring has arrived in full bloom at Green Hills Farm. A host of daffodils lining the driveway greets visitors. Amidst this splendor, our Writing Center was hosting two groups, so the Guild met downstairs this Sunday in the lounge, where all attendees could sit in comfortable high-backed swivel chairs.

Reminder to all that the PSB Literary Journal’s Spring 2017 issue’s deadline has been extended to May 15. A link to the Submission Guidelines can be found here. The theme of this issue is Renewal or Re-birth. Continue reading “April Guild Meets in 2017”

Coincidence in Romance and Mystery

By Anne K. Kaler

Anne Kaler Head ShotRomances deal with character development while mysteries depend on plot development. The hybrid of the two genres is called romantic suspense which often depends on coincidence to make a satisfying read. However, something vital gets lost when coincidence strays into the realm of the unbelievable ending.

Ann Hood’s recent novel The Book That Matters Most is such a hybrid because it involves so much unlikely coincidence of events. In fact, the book itself combines many tempting devices on its journey to a happy ending. Remember that the romance genre usually ends with the restoration of order to a disordered society and the promise of continued order through a marriage and the possibility of new life. On the other hand, the mystery genre ends with the satisfaction of justice being done to restore order. Mystery often has an innocent pair of young lovers to carry out its eventual hope for order in society.

So where does coincidence come into play? Continue reading “Coincidence in Romance and Mystery”

Important Guild News

First, please note the April Writers Guild meeting will take place at 1:30pm on Sunday, April 23rd downstairs in the Cultural Center (Red Barn building), Green Hills Farm, 520 Dublin Road, Perkasie, PA.

Departing from our usual third Sunday meeting date, to avoid the Easter holiday, has necessitated a location change, due to an earlier event booking upstairs at the barn. Please enter the building from the lower level off the walkway on the side of the barn facing the house.

Next, we remind all authors of the deadline of April 15th for our Pearl S. Buck Short Story contest. Here is a link to the details of the contest.

Finally, don’t forget to send in submissions to our Literary Journal – Issue 3, Spring 2017. You’ll find a link to the Submission Guidelines here. The deadline has been extended to May 15th. Any questions, please contact Cindy Louden, clouden@pearlsbuck.org.

Looking forward to seeing you at the April meeting, and remember to bring at least 10 copies of any writing selection – of up to 3 or 4 pages – that you would like to share.

Puzzles and Writing and the Human Mind

By Anne K. Kaler

Puzzle DoneIt is finished. The puzzle, that is. The writing is never finished.

The writing is truly never finished, never polished enough, never edited sufficiently because the story never fully ends in my mind. The characters and events continue to exist in my internal universe. I am never satisfied because I feel as if I have abandoned my created children on an alien planet without a working spaceship.

That’s why I do puzzles when I write. I need the constant encouragement that there is an end in sight — that there actually is a last puzzle piece to plunk into place, the only place in the material universe that it will fit.

So why do I persist in both endeavors? Continue reading “Puzzles and Writing and the Human Mind”

Spring Writer’s Conference ~ ‘Ready! Set! WRITE!’

By Cynthia L. Louden

Come WRITE!

at our Spring Writer’s Conference

Saturday, April 8, 2017         9 – 3 pm

at the Pearl S. Buck
National Historic Landmark House

At 9:15, Orlando R. Barone, noted op-ed writer, script writer, poet, and author of well-regarded college texts will open the Writers Conference. Lonnie’s op-ed pieces appear regularly in The Philadelphia Inquirer. He wrote the best-selling text, Your Voice Is Your Business. Lonnie is also the author of two novels, one published online and two additional books awaiting publication with the Pearl S. Buck Writing Center Press.IMG_lonnie barone

Lonnie’s original script, and lyrics to the original musical play A Musing Tale, were performed in 2016 by the Performing Arts Training Academy in Dallas, PA.  His articles have also appeared in such publications as Momentum Magazine, The Bible Today, and Human Resources.  On the graduate faculty of the Fox School of Business, Lonnie teaches effective writing in his course on business skills. He is also a leadership coach at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Lonnie wrote, developed, produced, and is featured in video-assisted training packages used by such companies as Johnson & Johnson, Merck, Exxon Mobil. He is a sought-after lecturer who has conducted creative writing seminars for executive groups and community leaders throughout the USA and abroad and has appeared on radio and TV talk shows. Orlando Barone received his BA from Villanova University and his master’s degree was awarded at the University of Delaware.

After a break for lunch and an Author’s House Tour, at 12:30 our second presenter, Jennifer Lin, will discuss her recent book writing and publishing process.  Famed TV journalist, Connie Chung says, “Only an experienced and dogged journalist like Jennifer could possibly investigate and write such a thoroughly gripping historical personal narrative.  I was with her every step of the way — not just because my parents were born in the Shanghai area but because I shared with her so very much.  You must join her for this worthwhile journey!”jennifer-lin

Jennifer Lin was an investigative reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer, including stints as a correspondent in China, New York and Washington, D.C. She left the paper in 2014 to finish writing her family memoir, Shanghai Faithful: Betrayal and Forgiveness in a Chinese Christian Family. Her father, Dr. Paul Lin, a Philadelphia neurosurgeon, left Shanghai in 1949 and took Jennifer and two sisters back to China for a family reunion thirty years later in June 1979. Hours after arriving, an uncle pulled Dr. Lin aside and whispered, “Do you have any idea what happened to us after you left?” This memoir is Jennifer’s attempt to answer that question and more. She weaves oral history with archival research to tell the complicated history of the Lin family going back 150 years. Jennifer will share with writers how she took interviews, letters, diaries, archival materials, newspaper accounts, church reports, diplomatic dispatches, genealogical records, and other primary source materials and turned them into a story about her Chinese family. Shanghai Faithful is a multigenerational saga of the Lin family, serving as a brisk history of Christianity in China. From 19th-century missions to the churches of war-torn Shanghai and today’s thriving house churches, Lin’s book vividly brings to life a country’s turbulent history and a family’s poignant struggles. When the Cultural Revolution appears to tear the family apart, forgiveness and understanding prevail, setting the stage for a new beginning. A native of Philadelphia, Jennifer lives in Doylestown with her husband, Bill Stieg, an editor at Men’s Health magazine. Her children are bicoastal with Karl Stieg working on documentary films in Los Angeles and Cory Stieg writing for the New York-based Refinery 29 women’s lifestyle website.

From 2 – 3pm, the Pearl Buck Writing Center staff will offer a Q&A panel which will offer additional writing suggestions to interested participants.

Register for the Spring Writing Conference at www.pearlsbuck.org/writingworkshops  Handicap accessible – ample free parking. includes an abbreviated Writers Tour of the Pearl S. Buck’s National Historic Landmark House. Presenters will also read from their works, and have books to sell. Bring a bag lunch. Coffee, tea, water will be provided. A 10% Discount on Gift Shop purchases is also included.

Sponsored by the Pearl S. Buck Volunteer Association, all proceeds benefit Pearl S. Buck International, 520 Dublin Rd, Perkasie 18944.

Directions: (from Doylestown) Route 313 & Maple Ave, Dublin; (from Montgomeryville) Route 309 North to Hilltown Pike and Dublin Road.

For more information, contact Cynthia L. Louden, Chr., Pearl S. Buck Writing Center, 267-421-6203 – clouden@pearlsbuck.org

Writers Guild News March 2017

By Linda Donaldson

Most of us are grateful to see the winter weather receding as March brings many new Writing Center classes, workshops and discussion groups. Our Writers Guild began our 2017 season, meeting in the Cultural Center on Sunday, March 19th.

Announcements prior to the meeting pointed to the change in April’s meeting date to the 23rd – the fourth Sunday in April – due to the desire to avoid Easter Sunday on March 16th.

The deadline for the Literary Journal – Issue 3, Spring 2017. has been extended and Writers Center participants are all encouraged to submit stories and poems by May 15th. You’ll find a link to the Submission Guidelines here.

Anne, Cindy and I welcomed one new member, Beth Taylor, and five other Guild members. Our number may have been small – several regular members sent emails explaining health issues would keep them away – but 3 selections were shared!

First, Jane Bleam brought a story of the adventures of her standard poodle, Spooky. I mention his breed to differentiate him from toy poodles. Spooky was big and so were the scrapes he got into. Comments encouraged Jane to include some more of the family’s feelings in Spooky’s earlier years. All found this a very enjoyable dog-lover’s story.

Next was a newly written introduction to John McCabe’s epic trilogy about exposure to nuclear testing by the Army by soldiers in the 1960s. John profound description of the dread and wonder of the first of his two test exposures was very moving. The only corrective comments were about sentence length.

Bob McCrillis read his selection, the second half of a chapter about how his high school teacher encouraged him and influenced not only his educational opportunities, but his later love for writing. Comments applauded his use of humor and realistic dialogue. The best compliment was requests about the first half of the chapter, wanting to know more.

Our best wishes for a swift recovery go out to Beverly Sce and Carol Kretovich, both of whom have had foot surgery and are recuperating. Sue Wagner is also recovering from a recent hospitalization and we hope to see her next month at the Guild meeting.

Finally, many writers find themselves including words inadvertently in their prose that are actually trademarked brand names. Some, such as Xerox™ and Kleenex ™ jump readily to mind, but after reading an article about attributing trademarks properly I wrote to DigitalSynopsis.com for permission, which they kindly gave, to reprint this up-do-date list of such words. Your link to that page can be found here.