Finding Your Market

by Sandy Cody

Editor’s Note: This message, shared with permission, is from Sandy Cody to her writing class at the end of this year’s classes.Sandy Cody

This will be our last meeting, but I hope you’ll find time in your busy schedules to keep writing. I’m in awe of what you’ve all come up with when given just a hint – and time. I think that’s what this class has been about – providing time and space for you to write.

If you want to send your “babies” out into the world, here’s something to get you started. Mainly, I suggest you just play around on the computer until you find something that looks interesting. Continue reading “Finding Your Market”

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Bits, Pieces, Kids

By Susan Wagner

What happens to those small bits of writing you do that don’t seem to fit easily into a category? You know what I mean — comments on __ (fill in the blank), poems you started but never finished, novel ideas – you get the picture.

Maybe these pieces sit and wait on your desk, in a file or journal, or even on the computer. They languish until the day you remember them again. If you ever do. Continue reading “Bits, Pieces, Kids”

July Guild Meeting Highlights

By Linda Donaldson

Eight Writers Guild members came together this past Sunday for our July meeting. For the benefit of our new member, Holly Odell, we went around the table and introduced ourselves and told about our current writing projects.

It was announced that Sandy Cody, a presenter at PSB Writing Center workshops, and Guild member, sent two links from Authors Publish magazine: First Eleven Literary Journals that Read Submissions Blind (without regard to the author’s identity or previous publishing history). Second, a free PDF  The 2017 Guide to Manuscript Publishers.

Anne Kaler congratulated Bob McCrillis on the paperback proof copy he brought of his new collection of short stories published through CreateSpace. Entitled Puckerbrush: Stories of the Journey to Manhood. Bob had just finished rereading and marking the editing changes he plans to make before correcting them and releasing the book for publication. Continue reading “July Guild Meeting Highlights”

March Guild Meeting Sunday the 19th

By Linda Donaldson

 

We look forward to welcoming our current Writers Guild members and new Guild participants for our March meeting on Sunday, May 19th at 1:30pm in the Cultural Center [big red barn] at Green Hills Farm, 520 Dublin Road, Perkasie, PA.

Only one more snowstorm this winter – hopefully – stands in the way of Spring. On that note, don’t forget to send in submissions to our Literary Journal – Issue 3, Spring 2017. You’ll find a link to the Submission Guidelines here. The deadline has been extended to May 15th.

Our April meeting, originally scheduled for the 3rd Sunday has been moved to the 4th Sunday, April 23rd, thus avoiding Easter Sunday. Be sure to mark your calendars with this one-time scheduling change. May’s meeting returns to the 3rd Sunday on the 21st.

The Writing Center has many classes and workshops beginning this month and in early April. Visit our Writing Center program listings on the PSBI website to register online.

Our complimentary book discussion groups occur once a month on the 3rd Monday. Read and discuss books by and about our award-winning author Pearl S. Buck.

Concerning stories and poems for our Guild’s critique segment: If you plan to bring copies of your latest writing to share for comments, please limit excerpts to 3 or 4 pages and bring 10 to 15 copies to hand out.

Since we only devote about 10-15 minutes to each selection, remember to put your email address on your work to invite further comments after our meetings.

Become a follower on this blog and get immediate notification of blog posts with links. We feature helpful articles to get you started on your writing projects, and to polish your poetry and prose.

The Hook, The Body and The Twist

By Linda Donaldson

July’s Writers Guild meeting this past Sunday was full of shared work and spirited discussion. Anne introduced a guest, Lonnie Barone, author, lecturer and editorial writer for the Philadelphia Inquirer, who spoke about blogs and opinion editorials or op-eds.

On Sunday, Lonnie told us his simple 3-step formula: a hook, followed by the body or thesis, and the twist. Start by capturing the reader’s interest, tell the story, and end with something unexpected that will make the reader think. You can find Lonnie’s blog under our Resources heading entitled On Blogs and Op-eds. Continue reading “The Hook, The Body and The Twist”

On Blogs and Op-Eds

This is a blog about blogs. I blog, I’m doing it now. I also write op-eds, short essays suitable for publication on the opinion pages of newspapers or news sites. The forms are similar but distinct.

IMG_lonnie barone
Lonnie Barone

Op-eds must conform to a set of standards established by the editors of the site or paper to which it is submitted. Typical standards may include a word limit, often 500-700 words, stylistic norms, and attribution requirements. An Op-ed usually has a thesis or central idea driving the piece. The thesis usually derives from current news or events (though not always). Continue reading “On Blogs and Op-Eds”

On the Al Fun Bit (Alphabet)

By Anne K. Kaler

One of the first bits of knowledge a child must learn is the alphabet. In English there are 26 letters to remember and often they are sung in an easy-to-remember rhyme.

Did you know that there were several more letters than the familiar 26 that you committed to memory? Yep, there are at least three retirees from the alphabet hall of fame that I would like to introduce you to today. Meet THORN, WYNN, and &. Continue reading “On the Al Fun Bit (Alphabet)”